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DraftExpress - Dre is #3 NBA prospect in Pac-12

Discussion in 'Colorado Basketball Message Board' started by Buffnik, Oct 10, 2011.

  1. Buffnik

    Buffnik Real name isn't Nik Club Member Junta Member

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    #3,Andre Roberson, 6-7, Small Forward/Power Forward, Sophomore, Colorado



    Walker Beeken

    A late signee who was not considered a top-100 prospect by any of the major high school scouting services, Colorado'sAndre Robersonplayed 22.4 minutes per game as a freshman for the Buffaloes and led the team in rebounds, steals, and blocks per game while playing a minimal role offensively. With the departures of leading scorersAlec BurksandCory Higgins, Roberson should have more opportunity to showcase his offensive talents and seems poised for a breakout season.

    The intrigue with Roberson as an NBA prospect begins with his outstanding physical tools. The son of a professional basketball playing father and a mother with a volleyball background, three of Roberson's sisters were Division I NCAA athletes. Standing at 6'7” with a long, lean frame that looks like it should continue to fill out in time, he looks the part of an NBA small forward. On top of that, he's an extremely fluid, explosive athlete who enhances his physical gifts by playing with great energy.

    This was clear from his impact on the boards as a freshman. He averaged 13.5 rebounds per forty minutes pace adjusted, an incredible rate for a player his size—identical toKawhi Leonardlast season. Roberson often flew in from the perimeter and grabbed rebounds over the top of players, and was often used out of position at power forward, thanks to his abilities to compete on the glass with most big men.

    A big key to Roberson's success this season will be how well he can adapt to more of a featured role offensively. Never considered much of a scorer even in high school, he didn't really have any shot-creating or playmaking responsibilities as a freshman. He'll likely get more a chance to display that part of his game this season, which will play a major factor in determining just how much upside he has to tap into down the road.

    Regardless of how he progresses in that area, he already brings quite a bit to the table with his athleticism, length, and energy, which make a terror in transition, cutting to the basket, and creating extra possessions with his offensive rebounds. He's a tremendous finisher at the rim and was very efficient with his touches last season, converting an outstanding 64% on his 2-pointers last season.

    Roberson isn't a great shooter at this stage, but he did show some promise, knocking down a respectable 37% of his jumpers last season, including 34% from behind the arc. He didn't look particularly fluid in his limited attempts shooting off the dribble, but looked more comfortable with his feet set. Becoming more of a reliable catch-and-shoot threat from the perimeter would be a big boost for his NBA stock, and he seems capable of improving if he puts in the work, despite the fact that he only converted 55% of his free throws last season.

    Robertson's physical tools also manifest themselves on the defensive end, where he's capable of defending almost any player on the floor at the college level. He defended mainly power forwards last season, but he has the look of the prototypical stopper on the wing at the NBA level with his size, length, and ability to cause chaos on the ball and get out into the passing lanes, as well as challenge shots at the rim.

    Though it is too early to draw many conclusions on Roberson's NBA prospects after just one college season in a minimal role, it is clear that he possesses quite a bit of upside, and will be a player that scouts will be keeping an eye on. This season should shed more light on how his offensive game is developing and just how much potential he has down the road.

    From DraftExpress.comhttp://www.draftexpress.com#ixzz1aRxj73KQ
    http://www.draftexpress.com
     
  2. RumblinBuff

    RumblinBuff That one blogging guy Club Member

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    While I'm as excited as anyone to watch 'Dre play, and I can't help but acknowledge his athleticism, I'd be surprised if he makes the leap to NBA ready player after only one more season. Next season's NBA draft will be back-loaded by talent who stayed in college last season, and I find it hard to believe that 'Dre's offensive game prove next-level ready this quickly.

    That said, it wouldn't surprise me if he left after his junior campaign. He is a freak at getting to the ball. If you can defend and rebound, the NBA will find a spot for you.
     
  3. tante

    tante Club Member Club Member

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    They key will be for the refs to starting respecting him as a great player. He was called for a lot of fouls last season with very little contact on his part. They type of fouls that never get called on great players.
     
  4. Mick Ronson

    Mick Ronson Well-Known Member

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    i love how the article acts like most non-late signees are de facto top 100 guys. if only...

    the NBA has different positions than the college game. look at a guy like Najera or Scalabrini. the hustle guy is a position....and i think Dre can do that as good as those guys.
     
  5. CUSoldier

    CUSoldier New Member

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    I think having his sister come to CU will help him stay around through his senior year. Especially if he isn't projected as a lottery pick after his junior year.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2011
  6. Ruckus

    Ruckus Peep my words. Club Member

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    He is definitely a prospect based on athleticism, effort, rebounding, and defense. The problem is offense. He can get to the rim and make some uncontested spot up shots, but learning to create his own shot off the dribble and to make shots with a defender in his face is the most difficult of all of these skills to learn. It worries me if we have to rely on him too much offensively. I think 10 & 10 is a good expectation, but if we need him to consistently get 15-18/game to be competitive, it will be a rough year.
     
  7. Buffnik

    Buffnik Real name isn't Nik Club Member Junta Member

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    I think he's a poor man's Dennis Rodman. Pretty much the exact same size and build. If he can develop into the passer that Dennis was, we'll really have something.
     
  8. azbuff

    azbuff Club Member Club Member

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    As much as I love Dre, unless he shows a lot offensively in the next two years, it is hard to see an NBA team spending a first round pick on him (maybe a team like the Spurs at 28 or similar).
     
  9. dyemeduke

    dyemeduke Well-Known Member

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    I like Dre. His energy is great and he knows how to get to the ball.

    He however has a LOT of work to do in order to become a 1st rounder. I just don't understand how he can be considered the third best NBA prospect. I agree with Ross and Smith, but at this moment, I'd take Reeves Nelson and Abdul Gaddy ahead of Dre. I understand that Dre may have a higher ceiling (and the NBA loves to draft based on potential), but he has a lot of work to do.

    The PAC 12 does have some great freshmen that were not included in the article - Josiah Turner, Jabari Brown, Tony Wroten and Angelo Chol will be studs in my opinion.

    I like the comparison to a poor man's Rodman. However, one thing I've always thought was understated was that Rodman could score in bunches in college. Granted it was a small college, but still, the man had an offensive game.
     
  10. Ruckus

    Ruckus Peep my words. Club Member

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    Wow, I forgot how short Rodman is. 6'6" is not tall for a small forward, especially a power forward. Then you think about Charles Barkley at 6'5" as a great power forward...wow have things changed just in the last 15 years.
     
  11. BehindEnemyLines

    BehindEnemyLines beware the habu Club Member

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    6'5" is a stretch for the "round mound of rebound". Barkley was a heckuva rebounder coming out of college, tho. He kinda fell in love with the outside shot after a few years in the league.
     

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