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Interesting Article on Where the Athletes are...

Discussion in 'Colorado Football Message Board' started by MiamiBuffs, Jan 6, 2016.

  1. MiamiBuffs

    MiamiBuffs Wᴉɐɯᴉ qnɟɟs Club Member

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    Where to look for talent, by the state...

    Screen Shot 2016-01-06 at 10.25.20 AM.png

    Map shows the states with the best college football recruiting situations
    Having a lot of talent in your state in great. Not having to fight other in-state schools is even better.

    Three states are considered college football's recruiting elites: California, Florida, and Texas. There's one problem: each has at least seven FBS programs.

    So which states have the most FBS talent per program?

    Let's divide each state's average annual number of 247Sports Composite three-star-and-up recruits by its number of FBS programs, all over the last five classes. For states without FBS programs, the number is the state's average of such recruits per year.

    Leading is New Jersey, with 44.4 FBS-level recruits per year and just one program, Rutgers. The Scarlet Knights don't have a history of championships, but there's more than enough talent to sustain a successful program.

    Georgia, which only trails the big three in raw numbers, comes in at second place in density due to its relatively small number of FBS schools (four). Missouri, a state that produces more than 20 FBS-level recruits per year with just one program, also rates well.

    Despite having so many programs, the big three still rate well here, with Florida by far in front.

    Maryland ranks seventh with 36.8 three-star-and-up recruits per year and just two programs, but one (Navy) is a service academy, and those don't recruit all that locally. Virginia also ranks well, and throw in D.C., a tiny area that produces 10.8 such recruits per year. The DMV appears to be underutilized by national powers, and NFL Draft results seem to agree.

    http://www.sbnation.com/college-football-recruiting/2015/4/15/8143431/states-most-players-recruits

    What intrigues me about Texas is that there are enough 3/4/5 star recruits to fill every class in every FBS program in that state. Because there are so many FBS schools. Now, not all of them are that good but several of those 12 programs are legit, big time programs. Whereas other states FBS programs have more recruits than they can actually offer.

    Maybe thats why were targeting Florida and Georgia. And partly why were having less success in Texas.

    Another thing that caught my eye is that California produces a 1/3 to 1/4 fewer players than Texas and Florida. Also that Georgia generates almost as many 3* plus FBS athletes as California
     
  2. J.R. Ewing

    J.R. Ewing Club Member Club Member

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    I wish they had done it with just P5 schools as well.
     
  3. MiamiBuffs

    MiamiBuffs Wᴉɐɯᴉ qnɟɟs Club Member

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    I agree in a way because it increases the numbers.

    Texas is probably 6 P5, 6 G5. But Houston is not a P5 school and is clearly an ascendant program that getting players. OU and OSU also pull a lot of talent out of Texas so its really like 8 P5 schools.

    Florida has 3 P5 schools. California has 4 P5. Georgia has 2 P5 programs. Jersey and Maryland have only 1 P5 each.
     
  4. hokiehead

    hokiehead Gobbler on the Mountain Club Member

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    interesting.

    one issue i have looking at this state by state, is that state boundaries mean different things across the country. Some combination of state sizes and historical culture seem to drive very different attitudes.

    In the Northeast, those boundaries mean little. Kids in NY/NJ view UConn and Penn State as home schools as much as they do Rutgers and Syracuse. Nobody in New Jersey has any hope of the 4* kid signing w/ Rutgers.

    In the Southeast (except maybe Florida) and, to a lesser extent, in the mid-West, state boundaries mean a lot and it is a big deal when a 4* leaves the state for another school.

    I haven't figured out the West yet.
     
  5. BlackNGold

    BlackNGold Club Member Club Member

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    To expand on Hokie's point, the article does math based just upon number of schools within the state borders but Schools like Oklahoma and Okie State recruit the heck out of Texas and the entire PAC 12 recruits California. Someone did a study several years ago and found that schools within 500 miles of a recruit had better success getting a recruit than schools farther away. Phoenix is 373 miles from LA for example. So within the state borders is not always a good indicator of competition.
     
    hokiehead likes this.
  6. Clean Undies

    Clean Undies Flagship of the 12-Pac Club Member

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    Bottom 10: Colorado 6th from last.

    In the company of Nub and NikeU
    image.png
     
  7. Tatanka™

    Tatanka™ Well-Known Member

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    I would argue that the local talent situation isn't quite as bad as that list suggests. Air Force doesn't really count as a state school. They get their players from all over the country with no extra emphasis on Colorado kids. It's really just CU and CSU trying to keep the local talent here.
     
  8. buffaholic

    buffaholic Club Member Club Member

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    Which wouldn't change much. 60 divided by 2 schools over 5 years boosts the number to 6, firmly above Kansas!
     

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