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Kicking for A Cure

Discussion in 'Colorado Football Message Board' started by 7Rock, Jul 17, 2009.

  1. 7Rock

    7Rock Member

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    This past Saturday I hosted a kicking competition at Upland High to raise money for juvenile diabetes.
    It was called The Golden State Kicking Challenge.

    I invited all the kicking schools I knew to be a part of this.
    Quite a few joined in the effort, even if they were from out of state.
    Kohl`s Kicking, Zendejas Kicking, West Coast Kicking Academy, Snap-Hold-Kick, and Mike Lansford Kicking were all sponsors.

    I have five sons, and my fourth son, Luke, was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes when he was just six years old.
    That`s the reason we`re helping to find a cure.

    The event attracted 44 kickers, snappers, and punters, and raised almost $1,500 for JDRF (Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation).

    We had kickers from 7th grade all the way through college kickers competing.
    Luke was the only 7th grader, but he beat all the 8th graders to win the Youth FG competition.

    What was really cool is that a Soph won the Frosh/JV kickoff and FG competitions........and after the competition was over, his mom came up to me to tell me that he too was a Type 1 Diabetic.

    Here`s a few pics from the day.

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    That`s my first grandson getting an early start in the kicking game!


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    Luke kicking off.


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    Luke watching a FG.


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    Jake kicking a FG.
     
  2. DBT

    DBT Club Member Club Member

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    Don't know if you ever saw my thread on my co-worker's wife. She has juvenile diabetes. She recently had an islet cell transplant at the Mayo clinic. It's been close to a year, I think. Well, she is now off insulin and is producing it naturally. She is able to excersize and do things she hasn't been able to do for years. Very cool.

    Great job with the fund raiser and all the best for your family! :thumbsup:
     
  3. 7Rock

    7Rock Member

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    No, I didn`t see the thread.
    Got a link?

    Do you know if she`s Type 1 or Type 2?

    If she`s Type 1, that is truly amazing.
    They are working on so many things and getting so close.

    I really want to hear more about your friend.
     
  4. 7Rock

    7Rock Member

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    Dummy me.

    I missed that you said juvenile diabetes.

    I really do want to hear everything about her.
    That`s incredible.
     
  5. sweaty teets

    sweaty teets Club Member Club Member

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    you sir, are a good man, and a great addition to this board.
     
  6. FlatironsBuff

    FlatironsBuff Club Member Club Member

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    The problem with having a great man here is that many of us will be exposed for the schmucks that we are.......:smile2:
     
  7. Skidmark

    Skidmark Flagship of the 12-Pac Club Member

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    Never before have I seen a charity kicking camp
    - its a great idea for a good cause
    - the photography is good
    - sounds like you have some great kids, an a whole lot of fun adventures ahead of you
     
  8. buffwings

    buffwings Club Member Club Member

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    :iagree::congrats: You are a :welcome: addition to this board. :thumbsup:
     
  9. MtnBuff

    MtnBuff Not allowed in Barzil 2 Club Member

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    A good friend of mine has a son who has juvenile diabetes. It has completely changed their lives but they are working on giving their son as normal a life as possible and he is a very happy kid. Because these kids are so normal in every other aspect of their lives except the diabetes it is easy for people to not realize how many kids (and families) are impacted and how significant the impact is.

    I know through some of what he has talked to me about that they are right on the verge of some really major breakthroughs that will have huge impacts on a lot of people. These are not pie in the sky things that might work out in 25 years but rather things that if developed may be helpful to the kids who are dealing with the condition right now.

    To all who read this, if you want give some money to something that can really make a difference this is one cause where that will be the case. Keep your eyes open for local events or send something to your local chapter of the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation.
    http://www.jdrf.org/index.cfm?page_id=100687

    I know this is a shameless plug but they are making real progress
     
  10. 7Rock

    7Rock Member

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    Thanks for posting the link, MtnBuff.

    Fact Sheets: Type 1 Diabetes (Juvenile Diabetes) Facts

    Affects Young Children


    Type 1 diabetes strikes children suddenly, makes them dependent on injected or pumped insulin for life, and carries the constant threat of devastating complications. While diagnosis most often occurs in childhood and adolescence, it can and does strike adults as well. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. While the causes of this process are not yet entirely understood, scientists believe that both genetic factors and environmental triggers are involved.
    Needs Constant Attention
    To stay alive, people with type 1 diabetes must take multiple insulin injections daily or continually infuse insulin through a pump. They must also test their blood sugar by pricking their fingers for blood six or more times per day. While trying to balance insulin doses with their food intake and daily activities, people with this form of diabetes must always be prepared for serious hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) and hyperglycemic (high blood sugar) reactions, both of which can be life-limiting and life threatening.
    Insulin Does Not Cure It
    While insulin allows a person to stay alive, it does not cure diabetes nor does it prevent its eventual and devastating effects, which may include: kidney failure, blindness, nerve damage, amputations, heart attack, stroke, and pregnancy complications.
    Difficult to Manage
    Despite rigorous attention to maintaining a meal plan and exercise regimen, and always injecting the proper amount of insulin, many other factors can adversely affect efforts to tightly control blood sugar levels including: stress, hormonal changes, periods of growth, physical activity, medications, illness/infection, and fatigue.
    Statistics and Warning Signs​

    • As many as 3 million Americans may have type 1 diabetes.
    • Each year more than 15,000 children are diagnosed with diabetes in the U.S. That's 40 children per day.
    • Warning signs of type 1 diabetes include: extreme thirst, frequent urination, drowsiness or lethargy, increased appetite, sudden weight loss for no reason, sudden vision changes, sugar in urine, fruity odor on breath, heavy or labored breathing, stupor or unconsciousness. These may occur suddenly.
    What is it like to have type 1 diabetes?​
    Ask people who have type 1 diabetes. It's difficult. It's upsetting. It's life threatening. It doesn't go away.
    "Both children and adults like me who live with type 1 diabetes need to be mathematicians, physicians, personal trainers and dieticians all rolled into one. We need to be constantly factoring and adjusting, making frequent finger sticks to check blood sugars, and giving ourselves multiple daily insulin injections just to stay alive." ​
    - JDRF International Chairman, Mary Tyler Moore
    "This disease controls our lives with all the pricking of the fingers, shots, high and low blood sugars; it's like being on a seesaw. Without a cure, we will be stuck on this seesaw till the day we die."
    - Tre Kawkins, 12, Michigan
    "I want to live someday without thinking about my diabetes. It's a lot for a little kid to keep up with." ​
    - Luke Varadi, 11, South Carolina​
    "Diabetes has made me different than all my friends. I have an extra burden to carry." ​
    - Caroline McEnery, 17, Connecticut​
     

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