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Recruiting Forum Guidelines & Stoudt's Recruitipedia

Discussion in 'University of Colorado Recruiting Archive' started by Buffnik, Oct 28, 2009.

  1. Buffnik

    Buffnik Real name isn't Nik Club Member Junta Member

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    Welcome to the Recruiting Forum



    Recruiting Forum Guidelines
    Personal attacks against recruits, players or members will not be tolerated. Keep in mind that parents, coaches, and athlete's themselves view these boards. All users are required to represent AllBuffs in a positive manner.

    Please use common sense during any discussion about any recruits. Critiquing a recruit's performance is acceptable, just keep in mind that these are high school kids here.


    Do not post Premium Info from other sites except in teaser form (if an article) or if the information has aged a day (if from a message board). If it's been reported from multiple premium sources, don't worry about posting the info since no one can call it their exclusive premium content any more.If you are unsure about whether it's ok to post something, just ask a mod.


    Do not post full stories. You are permitted to post a summary of an article or quote several lines of it and a link to the full story, but not the full article.


    Do not hijack a player's thread. We all know that Clark Evans is Superman. But we don't need to turn his Profile thread into a discussion of why you like Clark bars, which woman who played Lois Lane on tv or in the movies is the hottest, etc., etc. :huh:


    Before posting a thread, use the 'Recruit Profile Index', or the search feature to ensure there is not already a profile already up on the recruit. If there is already an existing thread, please use it.


    The moderators have the final word. If you disagree with a Mod, do not attempt to settle your dispute on the board. Simply PM an Admin and the situation will be settled.

    You may be a booster (most of us are). Be sure to: Protect Your Team

    An additional rule for the Recruiting Forum is that we ask you to avoid making negative posts about the CU program, its coaches or a prospect's decision to become a Buff.

    Further, any thread topics which discuss whether something going on with the program may have a negative impact on recruiting belongs in the CU Football forum.

    Please remember that many potential Buffs pay attention to Internet forums. Our recruiting forum should be one place that is focused solely on how a prospect can help the Buffs get back to national prominence where we belong.

    To re-iterate some of the most important rules regarding sourced material that you want to post:


     
  2. Buffnik

    Buffnik Real name isn't Nik Club Member Junta Member

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    STOUDT'S RECRUITIPEDIA

    Stoudt's Recruitipedia[SUP]TM[/SUP]
    (all rights reserved :wink2:) is a lexicon of terms used in discussing Recruiting and Rosters, particularly as it pertains to football. If you notice any mistakes, omissions or have any questions, please post them. Stoudt's Recruitipedia is meant to be a living document that will evolve over time with the input of AllBuffs members.

    5-Year Eligibility Clock: According to NCAA Bylaw 14.2.1, a student athlete shall complete his seasons of participation within five calendar years from the beginning of the semester or quarter in which the student athlete first registered for a minimum full-time program of studies in a collegiate institution, with time spent in the armed services, on official church missions or with recognized foreign aid services of the U.S. government being excepted. The Clock applies equally to Scholarship and Non-Scholarship student athletes.

    Academic Progress Rate (APR): Instituted in 2005, APR is a metric established by the NCAA to measure the success or failure of collegiate athletic teams in moving student-athletes towards graduation. Collegiate sports teams that fail to achieve an APR score of 925 - equivalent to a 50% graduation rate - may be penalized with the loss of scholarships. The number of scholarships penalized will usually equal the number of athletes who left the program while ineligible during the period used to calculate the APR and be no more than 10% of the Scholarship Limit for the sport. A perfect score is 1000. The scores are calculated as follows:
    The APR is calculated by allocating points for eligibility and retention -- the two factors that research identifies as the best indicators of graduation. Each player on a given roster earns a maximum of two points per term, one for being academically eligible and one for staying with the institution. A team's APR is the total points of a team's roster at a given time divided by the total points possible. Since this results in a decimal number, the CAP decided to multiply it by 1,000 for ease of reference. Thus, a raw APR score of .925 translates into the 925 that will become the standard terminology. The current year’s APR score is calculated as the average of the previous 4 academic years. For example, the APR released in the spring of 2010 represents the APR average score for 2005-06, 2006-07, 2007-08, and 2008-09. Non-scholarship players are not counted in the calculation.

    Blue Chip: An elite player at his position coming out of high school.

    Committable / Non-Committable Offer: A verbal or written offer to a recruit may be Committable or Non-Committable. A Committable Offer means that the college will accept a verbal commitment and reserve a scholarship for the athlete. A Non-Committable Offer is usually a contingent offer that tells the prospect that the college is very interested, but that the prospect is a backup plan in case one or more primary recruiting targets commit elsewhere.

    Contact: A contact occurs any time a coach has any face-to-face contact with a prospect or his parents off the college's campus and says more than hello. A contact also occurs if a coach has any contact with a prospect or his parents at his high school or any location where he is competing or practicing.

    Contact Period: During this time, a college coach may have in-person contact with a prospect and/or his parents on or off the college's campus. The coach may also watch him play or visit his high school. The prospect and his parents may visit a college campus and the coach may write and telephone him during this period.

    Dead Period: The college coach may not have any in-person contact with a prospect or his parents at any time in the Dead Period. The coach may write and telephone a prospect or his parents during this time.

    Early Enrollment: A player who graduates from high school a semester early and enrolls at the college for the spring semester. This is encouraged to get the player ready for playing time that upcoming season. It allows the player to participate in spring practices and get a jumpstart on college coursework prior to the start of his true freshman year.

    Early Signing Period: In football, the Early Signing Period is in December and January. Its use is restricted to JUCO transfers who wish to sign a Letter of Intent. In basketball, the Early Signing Period starts on the 2nd Wednesday in November and goes through the 3rd Wednesday in November. All prospects, including high school juniors, are eligible to sign a Letter of Intent during this period.

    Eligibility (Progress Toward Degree): Student-athletes must be enrolled in a minimum full-time program of studies, be in good academic standing as defined by their college or university, and make satisfactory progress toward a bachelor's degree. Full-time is generally defined as 12 hours per semester for Undergraduate students and 9 hours per semester for Graduate students.

    24 hours must be earned before the student enters the 2nd year of enrollment. Up to 6 credit hours per academic year may be earned during the summer. The student athlete must declare a major leading to a degree by the beginning of his third year in school. From that point, the 40%/60%/80% rule applies. In order to remain eligible for competition, student-athletes must satisfactory complete a certain percentage of course requirements in the specific degree program based on the student's year in residence:
    • By the start of 3rd year - 40%
    • By the start of 4th year - 60%
    • By the start of 5th year - 80%
    ESPN (Scouts Inc.) Grade: The following is the football grading scale. Basketball is almost the same, with subtle differences.

    Rare prospects: 100-90
    These players demonstrate rare abilities and can create mismatches that have an obvious impact on the game. These players have all the skills to take over a game and could make a possible impact as true freshmen. They should also push for All-America honors with the potential to have a three-and-out college career with early entry into the NFL draft.

    Outstanding prospects: 89-80

    These players have the ability to create mismatches versus most opponents and have dominant performances. These players could contribute as a true freshmen and could end up as all-conference or All-America candidates during their college careers and develop into difference-makers over time.

    Good prospects: 79-70
    These players show flashes of dominance, but not on a consistent basis -- especially when matched up against the top players in the country. Players closer to a 79 rating possess BCS-caliber ability and the potential to be a quality starter or all-conference player. Players closer to a 70 rating are likely non-BCS conference caliber prospects.

    Solid prospects: 69-60
    These players are overmatched versus the better players in the nation. Their weaknesses will be exposed against top competition, but have the ability to develop into solid contributors at the non-BCS FBS level and could be a quality fit for the FCS level of play.

    Prospects: 59-50
    Players have some redeeming qualities but are not projected to contribute at the FBS or FCS levels.

    Prospects: Not ranked or NR

    Evaluations are pending film evaluation. These players will have a grade of "NR" and that means we have not had a chance to fully evaluate the prospect.

    Rankings prior to the 2013 class
    Players in the classes before 2013 were ranked on a different scale with five-star prospects falling within 85-100, four stars between 79.5-84.99, three stars between 75-79.49, two stars between 68-74.99 and one stars between 55-67.99.

    Evaluation: An evaluation is an activity by a coach to evaluate a prospect’s academic or athletics ability. This would include visiting his high school or watching him practice or compete.

    Evaluation Period: The college coach may watch the prospect play or visit his high school, but cannot have any in-person conversations with the prospect or his parents off the college's campus. The prospect and his parents can visit a college campus during this period. A coach may write and telephone the prospect or his parents during this time.

    Full Qualifier: A recruit that meets both the core GPA and test score Initial Eligibility Requirements from the NCAA Clearinghouse.

    Grayshirt (GS): Refers to a recruited player who will either be unable or chooses not to enroll in time for the fall semester and will instead enroll in the following semester or year. If voluntary, the reason may be that the college has signed more players for that season than permissible under NCAA rules. The recruit can then count against the following year's allocation. It may also be that the player is young for his age or a bit of a late bloomer and needs the extra time to physically develop. If involuntary, the reason is usually that the player failed to achieve a qualifying test score on the ACT/SAT or qualifying core GPA prior to the fall semester and needed to re-take coursework or achieve a higher test score during the fall semester.

    Junior College Prospect (JC or JUCO): A Junior College Prospect, or JUCO, generally falls into one of two categories. Either he was a Non Qualifier out of high school or he was lightly recruited out of high school and decided to go the JUCO route in order to develop as a player. JUCO athletes who were Full Qualifiers out of high school may transfer to a 4-year college from a JUCO at any time and be immediately eligible to play, assuming the student athlete has enough credits to show the required progress toward his degree. Other JUCOs were Non Qualifiers and need to finish their 2-year degree before they are able to transfer to a 4-year college. JUCO graduates may be December graduates (can enroll in January and participate in spring practices) or spring graduates (can enroll for summer courses).

    Late Qualifier (LQ): A Late Qualifier is a prospect that does not look like he will achieve the necessary grades or test score to be a Full Qualifier, is expected to attend a Post Graduate school or Junior College, and then manages to become a Full Qualifier in time to receive a scholarship to a four-year college for his freshman year. Sometimes a LQ will end up Grayshirting as he takes care of qualification issues during what would have been the first semester of his freshman year.

    Letter of Intent (LOI): May only be signed by prospective student-athletes who will be entering a four-year institution for the first time in the academic year after they sign the LOI. Recruits who have signed LOIs must attend the schools they have signed with in order to receive financial aid, and NCAA rules forbid other coaches from recruiting them further. These restrictions aim to add certainty to the recruiting process for both players (who are certain to receive aid) and coaches (who are certain that a recruit will attend their school) alike. In some cases, such as a coaching change or a personal tragedy in the player’s life, the college may agree to release the player from a LOI so that the player may re-open his recruitment and sign elsewhere (or re-sign with the same college after evaluating other options).

    Medical Redshirt (aka Medical Hardship Waiver): The NCAA may grant a petition from an athlete to extend the 5-Year Eligibility Clock to a 6th year if the athlete is able to document that a season was lost due to medical reasons. The requirements for a Medical Hardship Waiver are that the athlete cannot have appeared in 3 games or 30% of the team’s regular season games (whichever is greater), has not appeared in any games after the mid-point in the season, and the reason for the athlete’s season ending prematurely is a medically documented injury or illness.

    National Signing Day (NSD): Always on the first Wednesday in February for football. NSD is the first day a high school senior can sign a binding National Letter of Intent. Most football prospects fax in their signed Letters of Intent on NSD, but they do have the option of waiting until a future date to sign.

    NCAA Clearinghouse: The NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse is the organization that determines whether prospective college athletes are eligible to play sports at NCAA Division I or Division II institutions. It does this by reviewing the student athlete's academic record, SAT or ACT scores, and amateur status to ensure conformity with NCAA rules. Division I has a sliding scale for test score and grade-point average as follows:
    16 Core Courses:
    4 years of English.
    3 years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher).
    2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered by high school).
    1 year of additional English, mathematics or natural/physical science.
    2 years of social science. 4 years of additional courses (from any area above, foreign language or nondoctrinal religion/philosophy).​

    The overall GPA is calculated from the 16 core courses. A minimum 2.0 GPA is required. The higher the GPA, the lower the SAT or ACT score required. For example, a recruit with a 2.0 core GPA would need a 1010 SAT score (combined verbal & math) or an 86 ACT score. However, a recruit with a core GPA or 3.55 or above would only need a 400 combined SAT score or a 37 ACT score. Link

    Non Qualifier / Partial Qualifier: A recruit that fails to meet either the minimum core GPA and/or test score Initial Eligibility Requirements from the NCAA Clearinghouse, is considered a Non Qualifier or Partial Qualifier. The NCAA does not preclude colleges from admitting Non Qualifiers or Partial Qualifiers, but the athlete would not be eligible to compete or practice until he has shown minimum progress toward his degree. Further, the athlete may only receive need-based financial aid during his first year on campus.

    Usually, the individual athletic conferences set policies for the granting of scholarships to Non Qualifiers and Partial Qualifiers by conference members. For example, under the Big 12 rules, only two male and two female partial qualifiers are allowed to enroll each year, with no more than one athlete in each sport. However, the Pac 10 bylaws are more strict, stating that “Member institutions shall not provide athletically related financial aid to any student who is not a qualifier”.

    Official Visit: Any visit to a college campus by a prospect and his parents paid for by the college. The college may pay the following expenses: Transportation to and from the college;
Room and meals (three per day) while the prospect is visiting the college; and,
 Reasonable entertainment expenses, including three complimentary admissions to a home athletics contest.

    A prospect may not take more than five official visits and each visit may not last longer than 48 hours. Official visits may not be taken by a prospect until after the first day of classes of his senior year. There is a limit to the number of Official Visits that a college may host (56 for football, 12 for basketball) and for football up to 6 unused visits may be carried forward to the next year.
     
  3. Buffnik

    Buffnik Real name isn't Nik Club Member Junta Member

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    Post Graduate (PG): A prospect that enrolls in a fifth year of high school at a preparatory school or military academy. The prospect's high school GPA is locked and can only be improved by retaking courses. A prospect does not lose college eligibility while competing for a prep school or military academy and has an opportunity to meet the NCAA Clearinghouse Initial Eligibility Requirements if he fell short after four years of high school. Some athletes may also choose a Post Graduate year in order to get noticed and increase his college scholarship choices.

    Preferred Walk On (PWO): A recruited player that is enrolling at the college and is guaranteed a roster spot but does not have a scholarship offer. Coaches may invite them to join the team to help on the practice squad or special teams in football. Often a PWO is verbally given a contingent scholarship offer. If the player works his way up into the regular playing rotation, he may be awarded a scholarship. Coaches may also award a scholarship during the last year of eligibility to a walk-on who has been with the team for several seasons and if the team has scholarships available.

    Quiet Period: The college coach may not have any in-person contact with the prospect or his parents off the college's campus. The coach may not watch the prospect play or visit his high school during this period. The prospect and his parents may visit a college campus during this time. A coach may write or telephone the prospect or his parents during this time.

    Redshirt (RS): Refers to delaying an athlete's participation in order to lengthen his or her period of eligibility. Typically, a student's athletic eligibility in a given sport is four seasons, a number derived from the four years of academic classes that are normally required to obtain a bachelor's degree at an American college or university. However, a student-athlete may be offered the opportunity to redshirt for one year, which allows the athlete to spread those four years of eligibility over five years. In a redshirt year, a student athlete may attend classes at the college or university, practice with an athletic team, and dress for play but he or she may not compete during the game. Using this mechanism, a student athlete has up to five academic years to use the four years of eligibility, thus creating the phenomenon of the "fifth-year senior." The Redshirt is generally used to allow a player to physically mature and develop as an athlete.

    Regular Signing Period (basketball): It starts the third Wednesday in April, after high schools throughout the U.S. have completed their basketball seasons. This is the first date that basketball prospects can sign a LOI after the Early Signing Period from about 5 months earlier has ended.

    Rivals Rating (rr): Players are also ranked on their quality with a star ranking. A five-star prospect is considered to be one of the nation's top 25-30 players, four star is a top 250-300 or so player, three-stars is a top 750 level player, two stars means the player is a mid-major prospect and one star means the player is not ranked.
    The ranking system ranks prospects on a numerical scale from 6.1-4.9:

    6.1 (5*) Franchise Player; considered one of the elite prospects in the country, generally among the nation's top 25 players overall; deemed to have excellent pro potential; high-major prospect

    6.0-5.8 (4*) All-American Candidate; high-major prospect; considered one of the nation's top 300 prospects; deemed to have pro potential and ability to make an impact on college team

    5.7-5.5 (3*) All-Region Selection; considered among the region's top prospects and among the top 750 or so prospects in the country; high-to-mid-major prospect; deemed to have pro potential and ability to make an impact on college team

    5.4-5.0 (2*) Division I prospect; considered a mid-major prospect; deemed to have limited pro potential but definite Division I prospect; may be more of a role player

    4.9 (1*) Sleeper; no Rivals.com expert knew much, if anything, about this player; a prospect that only a college coach really knew about​

    Roster Limit: The NCAA allows a maximum of 105 football players to practice and participate in team activities during training camp. Beginning on the first day of classes, teams may expand rosters without limit.

    Scholarship: An award of financial aid to attend a college or university based predominantly on an individual’s ability to play a sport. The value of the financial aid is paid to the college or university out of the Athletic Department budget. Scholarships are awarded annually as one-year agreements between an athlete and the college or university.

    Scholarship Limit (recruiting class): The NCAA limits the number of scholarships that may be awarded in a given recruiting year. For football, that limit is 25 scholarships. Early Enrollees may be applied to the previous year’s recruiting class. Grayshirts may be applied to the following year’s recruiting class. This ability to apply certain recruits to the previous, current or future recruiting class is why sometimes a college is able to sign more than 25 prospects in a single year.

    Also, some colleges over-sign classes. Over-signing is usually done because academic risks have been taken and the college does not expect every signee to make it through the NCAA Clearinghouse. Often, over-signing allows a college to have influence on what Junior College the Non Qualifier decides to attend and gives the college a tremendous advantage in getting that prospect to re-sign with the college down the road as a Junior College Transfer. Different conferences may place different limits on over-signing.

    Scholarship Limit (total): The NCAA limits the number of scholarships that may be awarded in a particular sport. For football, that overall limit is 85 scholarships. For men’s basketball, 13, and for women’s basketball,15.

    Silent Commitment: A player who has verbally committed to a particular college or university but has not yet publicly disclosed it. Prior to the prospect signing a Letter of Intent, the college or university may not comment on the prospect so it is up to the prospect to make his commitment known. Sometimes a prospect will be asked by a program to remain a Silent Commitment, usually if he is an under-the-radar prospect that the program is trying to hide from other programs.

    Star Rating: The standard system used by recruiting services such as Rivals, Scout and Scouts Inc. (ESPN) to predict the college potential of a prospect. The rating scale goes from 5 stars (highest) to 1 star (lowest).

    While Star Rating is certainly not a perfect prediction tool, an analysis of the most recent NFL draft (April 2010) shows that Star Rating is a fairly good predictor of an athlete’s future success. The following was complied by rward, who posts a lot of excellent data analysis on the CU Rivals site:
    Of the 230 draftees in the Rivals database:
    20 five stars (9%) - five stars make up 1% of the rivals database
    72 four stars (31%) - four stars make up 12% of the rivals database
    74 three stars (32%) - three stars make up 31% of the rivals database
    64 two stars (28%) - two stars make up 56% of the rivals database​

    Transfer: A Transfer is a student athlete that begins his 5-Year Eligibility Clock at one college and then decides to enroll at a different college. For the sake of simplicity, Stoudt’s Recruitipedia will only look at the 3 Transfer scenarios that apply to CU: transferring to CU as a JUCO who was a Full Qualifier; transferring to CU as a JUCO who was a Non Qualifier; and, transferring to CU from a four-year college.
    JUCO Transfer (Full Qualifier): For an athlete who was a Full Qualifier, he may play immediately if he satisfies all 3 of the following requirements: 1) Completed at least one semester as a full-time student, not including summer school; 2) Earned at least an average of 12 semester credit hours for each term started at the JUCO and these credit hours must be transferable toward a degree at a four-year college; and, 3) Earned a GPA of at least 2.0 in those transferable credit hours. If the JUCO Transfer did not fulfill all of these requirements, he may practice and receive financial aid, but may not play until he has completed one full academic year of residence.

    JUCO Transfer (Non Qualifier): For an athlete who was a Non Qualifier, he may play immediately if he satisfies all 4 of the following requirements: 1) Completed at least three semesters as a full-time student, not including summer school; 2) Graduated from the JUCO with at least 25% of credit hours earned at the institution that granted the degree; 3) Earned at least 48 semester credit hours and these credit hours must be transferable toward a degree at a four-year college; and, 4) Earned a GPA of at least 2.0 in those transferable credit hours. If the JUCO Transfer did not fulfill all of these requirements, he may practice and receive financial aid, but may not play until he has completed one full academic year of residence. JUCOs are referred to as 2-4 Transfers.

    Four-Year College Transfer: A Transfer who goes directly from a four-year college to another four-year college (a 4-4 Transfer) will generally have to sit out a year before he is eligible to play. One exception to the 4-4 Transfer rule is that if the student athlete has completed his degree from his original college he may transfer to a new college for graduate school and not be required to spend a year in residency before playing.

    Another case with Four-Year College Transfers is that sometimes the student athlete will go from his original four-year college to a JUCO for some credits before transferring to a new four-year college (a 4-2-4 Transfer). In that case, the Transfer will need to have: 1) Earned at least an average of 12 semester credit hours for each term started at the JUCO and these credit hours must be transferable toward a degree at a four-year college; 2) Earned a GPA of at least 2.0 in those transferable credit hours; and, 3) Graduated from the JUCO and had at least one calendar year elapse since he left the previous four-year school. If the 4-2-4 Transfer did not fulfill all these requirements, he may practice and receive financial aid, but may not play until he has completed one full academic year of residence.
    Unofficial Visit: Any visit by a prospect and his parents to a college campus paid for by the prospect or his parents. The only expense the prospect may receive from the college is three complimentary admissions to a home athletics contest. The prospect may make as many unofficial visits as he likes and may take those visits at any time. The only time a prospect cannot talk with a coach during an unofficial visit is during a Dead Period.

    Verbal (Offer / Commitment): A Verbal Offer is a scholarship offer made to a prospect orally, usually over the phone. Usually, the coach will text or email the prospect asking the prospect to call (or contact the prospect’s high school coach with a call request). When the prospect calls, a Verbal Offer is given. A Verbal Offer may be given because it is prior to the prospect’s junior year and Written Offers may not be sent and/or because the coach wants to speak with the prospect prior to sending a Written Offer.

    The phrase “Verbal Commitment” is used to describe a college-bound student-athlete's commitment to a school before he signs (or is able to sign) a National Letter of Intent. A college-bound student-athlete can announce a Verbal Commitment at any time. While Verbal Commitments have become very popular for both college-bound student-athletes and coaches, this "commitment" is NOT binding on either the college-bound student-athlete or the school. Only the signing of the National Letter of Intent accompanied by a financial aid agreement is binding on both parties.

    Walk On (WO): A non-scholarship player who may approach the coaches without invitation about joining the team. In rare cases where a team may have a shortage of scholarship players due to some having left school unexpectedly, coaches may hold open try-outs to find players among the student body. A Walk On may earn a scholarship by earning a spot in the gameday rotation or, in some cases when scholarships are available, be awarded a scholarship for his senior year. If a WO earns a scholarship during his first two years of his eligibility clock, the scholarship counts back to the recruiting class he would have been in out of high school so the school must be under the limit of 25 for that year in order to assign a scholarship to a WO in that circumstance.

    Written Offer: A Written Offer is a scholarship offer made to a prospect in the form of a letter. Usually, it will follow within a few weeks of the college coach extending a Verbal Offer. The first day that the NCAA currently allows Written Offers to be extended to prospects is the fist day of the prospect’s junior year. While not binding on either party, the Written Offer is generally coveted by prospects as a more formal, official scholarship offer. Beginning in 2011, the first date a prospect can receive a Written Offer is August 1 of his senior year. Previously, it had been September 1 of his junior year.
     
  4. Buffnik

    Buffnik Real name isn't Nik Club Member Junta Member

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    Additional Info:

     
  5. Buffnik

    Buffnik Real name isn't Nik Club Member Junta Member

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    More Info:

     
  6. Buffnik

    Buffnik Real name isn't Nik Club Member Junta Member

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    Updated for the rule change on written scholarship offers in football. They cannot go out to prospects until August 1 of the senior year (previously September 1 of junior year). It's going to be interesting to see how this effects things.
     
  7. Darth Snow

    Darth Snow Hawaiian Buffalo Club Member Junta Member

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    For sure. Coaches will be showing up with offers at midnight (if they can) :lol:. overnight mail etc for big time recruits. Plus, a lot of recruits are gonna get a rude awakening on where they actually stand.
     
  8. Sexton Hardcastle

    Sexton Hardcastle Club Member Club Member

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    Why does the NCAA feel they need to micro manage every single aspect of everything? :lol:

    It's going to be real interesting to watch how this effects recruiting.
     
  9. Buffnik

    Buffnik Real name isn't Nik Club Member Junta Member

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    I think that the belief was that this would cut down on the trend toward early recruiting. Epic fail, obviously. Can't put that genie back in the bottle. We really need an early signing period for football.
     
  10. Darth Snow

    Darth Snow Hawaiian Buffalo Club Member Junta Member

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    Stolen from rward for adding to Recruitapedia: How Rivals ranks classes:

     
  11. dio

    dio Admin Club Member Junta Member

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    I just want to say that this thread is awesome. I find almost anything I need here, and I direct others - even fans of others teams - come review it. Simply awesome
     
  12. Darth Snow

    Darth Snow Hawaiian Buffalo Club Member Junta Member

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    shamelessly stolen from rward over at scoop:

     
  13. Sexton Hardcastle

    Sexton Hardcastle Club Member Club Member

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