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Title IX Funding Gap Between Men's & Women's Sports

Discussion in 'Colorado Football Message Board' started by Buffnik, Jun 15, 2016.

  1. Buffnik

    Buffnik Real name isn't Nik Club Member Junta Member

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    "NOBODY'S WATCHING": ARE MAJOR COLLEGE SPORTS PROGRAMS TREATING TITLE IX LIKE A SUGGESTION?

    ● According to EADA data, 46 percent of Power Five conference schools have a proportional athletic aid gap of two percent or more—a gap considered noncompliant under Title IX without additional explanation and justification.

    https://sports.vice.com/en_us/artic...-programs-treating-title-ix-like-a-suggestion

    *********************************

    I hate seeing CU so high on this list. However, I think for Colorado the numbers don't tell the whole story. CU eliminated sports down to the bare minimum for D1 participation. Then, in the past few years, eliminated Men's Tennis while adding Women's Lacrosse. This was all in an effort to become compliant with Title IX.

    And, yes, football costs more per athlete to run. What's keeping CU out of balance financially now that scholarships are finally balanced, I think, is that CU has so few scholarship sports. With football in there and the resources spread out over fewer athletes than most other schools, it's going to create a gap.

    At least yearly we have a thread in the CU Olympic Sports forum talking about what sports we'd like to see added at CU. Those always include balancing scholarships for Title IX. I think if and when CU adds more sports we will see the financial gap eliminated. link

    fwiw, I hope to see women's rowing & sand volleyball (23 W scholarships) along with men's soccer & men's lacrosse (22.5 M scholarships) once CU is in a position to add sports.
     
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  2. sackman

    sackman Club Member Club Member

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    That pretty much kills any chance for a new men's program of any kind, unfortunately.
     
  3. Buffnik

    Buffnik Real name isn't Nik Club Member Junta Member

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  4. Buffnik

    Buffnik Real name isn't Nik Club Member Junta Member

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    I'd suspect that CU does some of this stuff with having some male practice players going against the women's teams. Most everyone does and there are legit reasons to do so, but Baylor seems to really be pushing the envelope.
     
  5. Fight CU

    Fight CU Club Member Club Member

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    this is hilarious. and not in a funny way.
     
  6. skibum

    skibum Peed in your Cheerios. Club Member

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    So a guy I've worked some deals with lives in a Midwestern state and has two college age daughters who apparently were both somewhat athletic. Didn't really shine in one particular sport, but played several throughout high school.

    Both were offered partial athletic scholarships by one of the state schools - and they both declined - because they didn't really want to be D1 athletes.

    Their Dad tells me he was absolutely amazed, not that they turned the scholarships down, but that they were even offered in the first place.

    It's apparently not easy to for some women's teams to even find enough participants. (Which tells me they're looking in the wrong places more than anything... but maybe they don't have the recruiting budget that's actually necessary to find enough interested athletes.)
     
  7. Buffnik

    Buffnik Real name isn't Nik Club Member Junta Member

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    That's why rowing got singled out a bit in the article. 20 scholarships for women and little budget put toward it at most schools. In the Pac-12, they're competing to be Olympians. Most places? Just offer any in-state girl who made an all-state or all-area team in any sport who also was on the honor roll. Then, put her on scholarship for Title IX and teach her how to row.
     
  8. skibum

    skibum Peed in your Cheerios. Club Member

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    Oddly, I would be more supportive of this if you replaced "made all-state or all-area team" with "played a varsity sport in a high school in an underprivileged area."

    Giving underprivileged kids another path to a college education is a good thing. Throwing more money at upper-middle class kids who are going to go to college regardless doesn't really do anything except make numbers meet some bureaucratic government "goal."
     
  9. BuffsRising

    BuffsRising Well-Known Member

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    It would be informative to have the revenue gap between mens and womens sports on the same chart, but im guessing the title ix nazis arent interested in bringing that up.
     
  10. 96 Buff

    96 Buff Resident Commie Bastard Club Member Junta Member

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    **** you.
     
  11. Buffnik

    Buffnik Real name isn't Nik Club Member Junta Member

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    A bit about Title IX.

    It is designed to ensure equal opportunities for men and women to participate in college (amateur status) athletics.

    Each school has a student body that is some percentage men, some percentage women.

    Title IX is a federal requirement that within these amateur athletic departments at colleges, that the balance of scholarships and funding for men & women are reflective of their representation in the student body.

    Pragmatically, I've always been sympathetic to the argument that football should be exempted from this since it is a male-only sport without a female equivalent and because it provides the budget that allows a school to offer many more sports than it otherwise could without football. But that's not the case, so we end up with more women's sports and more scholarships for women than men in the sports they both play. Fair? From a certain point of view. Unfair from another.

    I find it interesting that CU is doing poorly on the chart I put in the OP and ended up front & center in the article graphic. CU offers more women's sports than men's sports and doesn't seem to out of whack with the resources put toward women's sports (I base this on what I see with national & international recruiting, training facilities, and scheduling that includes national travel). I have to believe that CU's numbers here are driven by 1) football being more expensive per athlete than other sports with CU having fewer sports & athletic scholarships to spread around to diffuse the math; and, 2) CU not playing the games with the Title IX math that was referenced for Baylor where 16% of those counted as female athletes are actually men participating on practice squads of women's teams.
     
  12. DBT

    DBT Club Member Club Member

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    it sucks being a guy these days.
     
  13. MtnBuff

    MtnBuff Not allowed in Barzil 2 Club Member

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    Thread was posted a while back on the topic but if you were to count spirit squads the numbers would be much more in balance.

    When it used to be just doing a lot of yelling and leading cheers in a short skirt there was reason not to count it but now the cheer squads, which are composted mostly of females, practice as much and as hard as a lot of the sports do, require comparable or superior athletic skills (bowling counts as a sport and spirit doesn't?) and provides many of the same experiences as varsity sports do. Most importantly they compete as intensely as most varsity sports do.

    By counting spirit as a sport it would give the participants full access to the athletic training and academic support services available to scholarship varsity athletes.
     
  14. SINKRATZ

    SINKRATZ Club Member Club Member

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    Are Ralphie handlers counted as a sport?
     
  15. skibum

    skibum Peed in your Cheerios. Club Member

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    Are there scholarships? I know they are officially considered varsity athletes by the University, but I don't know that there are any scholarships.

    (P.S. This is one of my few regrets: I didn't try and become a Ralphie handler.)
     
  16. Buffnik

    Buffnik Real name isn't Nik Club Member Junta Member

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    It has to be a competition sport. If CU had rodeo as a scholarship sport, I think that would count. I don't think it has to be NCAA sanctioned. For example, if CU wanted to start offering athletic scholarships for cycling (a number of schools do), I believe that those would have to count in the federal compliance numbers.
     
  17. 96 Buff

    96 Buff Resident Commie Bastard Club Member Junta Member

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    You can't ****ing be serious here.
     
  18. DBT

    DBT Club Member Club Member

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    You just never know.
     
  19. sackman

    sackman Club Member Club Member

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    Interesting to note that dance is a competitive endeavor. CU has a very well respected dance squad and they do compete at the national level. No scholarships, though.

    So what would it take to make dance a varsity sport with scholarships? That would do the trick right away. I think there's something like 40 on the dance team.
     
  20. DBT

    DBT Club Member Club Member

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    Is it an NCAA sanctioned sport?
     
  21. Buffnik

    Buffnik Real name isn't Nik Club Member Junta Member

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    Nope. That's been a debate for years. Many have wanted Cheer & Dance to be scholarship athletes that counted toward Title IX compliance in order to help offset the 85 football scholarships. Currently, to have D1 football you need to offer 85 more women's scholarships in other sports than you offer men. Cheer & Dance would go a long way toward closing that gap so that we maybe didn't see Men's Volleyball & Soccer getting killed at most schools while those same schools had Women's VB & Soccer programs.
     

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