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24-25 MBB Team

This is going to be an interesting offseason ... Tad's never had to wade this deep into the transfer portal, and frankly, his track record is spotty at best. In his 14 years, these are the only transfers I can recall from “solid” basketball schools. We almost need this many guys in one year!


- Eddie Lampkin (TCU)
- Josh Fortune (Providence)
- Jeriah Horne (Tulsa)
- Namon Wright (Missouri)
- Carlon Brown (Utah)

I don;t include Derrick White because that was a total anomaly. And I guess I could include Ethan Wright, since Princeton does go to the tourney a lot.
 
This is going to be an interesting offseason ... Tad's never had to wade this deep into the transfer portal, and frankly, his track record is spotty at best. In his 14 years, these are the only transfers I can recall from “solid” basketball schools. We almost need this many guys in one year!


- Eddie Lampkin (TCU)
- Josh Fortune (Providence)
- Jeriah Horne (Tulsa)
- Namon Wright (Missouri)
- Carlon Brown (Utah)

I don;t include Derrick White because that was a total anomaly. And I guess I could include Ethan Wright, since Princeton does go to the tourney a lot.

I dont think you should give as much credit to what school they came from. There generally is a reason they are leaving that school (cannot cut it). I would expect to see players that are coming from small schools, but exceled, trying to excel at a higher level.

Going after transfers that came from "solid basketball schools", is either going to be their cast offs, or require far more NIL than we are even able to start to discuss.

So although we say Derrick White is a total anomaly, that is who we are needing to find these days.
 
I dont think you should give as much credit to what school they came from. There generally is a reason they are leaving that school (cannot cut it). I would expect to see players that are coming from small schools, but exceled, trying to excel at a higher level.

Going after transfers that came from "solid basketball schools", is either going to be their cast offs, or require far more NIL than we are even able to start to discuss.

So although we say Derrick White is a total anomaly, that is who we are needing to find these days.
If we're looking for multiple Derrick White types to save us, we're doomed. He was the very essence of diamond in the rough, the rarest of finds.
 
Dalton Knechts and Max Abmas and Derrick Whites exist and happen far more frequently than you suggest.

>90% of Tad's transfer record is irrelevant given the exponential expansion of the portal.
Agreed, the Derrick White story is becoming far more common.

You mentioned Dalton, Derrick, Duncan Robinson, Max Strus, but even Joel Scott last year for the Rammies. WYO's second best player Akuel Kot came from Fort Lewis, WSU's Jaylen Wells who had an amazing year came from Sonoma State.

D2 and 3 players are finally getting chances to come up as a result of the transfer portal and success stories like White and Robinson and showing that if you are a great D2 player with an talent ala quickness, shooting, athleticism, etc you can make the jump up. Also a lot of late growth spurts in the cases of Knecht, White, etc.

Heck one of the most realistic players that I'm stoked about in the transfer portal is Trevor Baskin from Mesa.

I've always been surprised UNC or DU don't recruit Colorado as much as they could. As seen above there are usually some good underrecruited players that can be competitive in smaller D1 schools and a few that blossom into more.

You'll notice a lot of these players come from underrecruited or even overrecruited areas. IE Colorado has produced Scott, Knecht, White, Baskin alone but also overrecruited areas where a great player can fall down a high school rotation due to being surrounded by Elite talent or other players in the area stand out more at that stage but don't continue to improve. Kot was overlooked in Texas because of his slight frame, Wells was in Sacramento, Strus was Chicago and there were other highly recruited players at the time that were perceived as better.
 
This is going to be an interesting offseason ... Tad's never had to wade this deep into the transfer portal, and frankly, his track record is spotty at best. In his 14 years, these are the only transfers I can recall from “solid” basketball schools. We almost need this many guys in one year!


- Eddie Lampkin (TCU)
- Josh Fortune (Providence)
- Jeriah Horne (Tulsa)
- Namon Wright (Missouri)
- Carlon Brown (Utah)

I don;t include Derrick White because that was a total anomaly. And I guess I could include Ethan Wright, since Princeton does go to the tourney a lot.
I'm wondering if anybody in the portal played for Tad when he coached 'U19' (or whichever international team he coached when CW played.


From NE Junior College in Sterling:

Cliff Meely (July 10, 1947 – May 29, 2013) was an American basketball player who played five seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played one year at Northeastern Junior College in Sterling, Colorado, then at the University of Colorado Boulder for three years, from 1968 to 1971. He remains the Colorado Buffaloes' career leader in points per game and rebounds per game. Meely was a Big Eight all-conference performer all three years at Colorado, and was an All-American as a senior. He is one of only three Colorado basketball player to have his number retired.:
 
This is going to be an interesting offseason ... Tad's never had to wade this deep into the transfer portal, and frankly, his track record is spotty at best. In his 14 years, these are the only transfers I can recall from “solid” basketball schools. We almost need this many guys in one year!


- Eddie Lampkin (TCU)
- Josh Fortune (Providence)
- Jeriah Horne (Tulsa)
- Namon Wright (Missouri)
- Carlon Brown (Utah)

I don;t include Derrick White because that was a total anomaly. And I guess I could include Ethan Wright, since Princeton does go to the tourney a lot.
Why not J’Vonne Hadley?
 
I wonder if I have the self-restraint to not follow any news this offseason and have the season opener next year be my introduction to the new roster
 
New Big 12 schools in final AP rankings:

4. Houston
8. Iowa State
12. Arizona
16. Baylor
19. Kansas
28. COLORADO
29. BYU
36. Texas Tech

New Big 12 schools in final Coaches rankings:

3. Houston
8. Iowa State
12. Arizona
14. Baylor
21. Kansas
25. Texas Tech
26. BYU
29. COLORADO
 

SEC basketball scheduling currently has 18 games.

SEC basketball scheduling starting next season:

Currently, SEC basketball teams play 18 conference games. That schedule features three “permanent” opponents — in Kentucky’s case, those are Florida, Tennessee and Vanderbilt — that are played on a home-and-home basis each season, for a total of six games.

Each team then has two additional home-and-home series each season against opponents that rotate from year to year, adding another four games to the schedule. (This year, Kentucky will play Arkansas and Mississippi State twice.)

How it's going to work:

An SEC spokesperson confirmed to the Herald-Leader that, starting with the 2024-25 season, the new league schedule will look like this:

— Each team has two permanent opponents that they will place twice per season, home and away, for a total of four games.

— Each team has a third opponent that will also be played home and away. This opponent will rotate from season to season.

— That will leave 12 league rivals unaccounted for, and each team will have one matchup — six home games and six road trips, for a total of 12 games — against those teams.

— The SEC schedule will remain at 18 games under this format.

The Big 12 also has 18 games...perhaps the Big 12 will follow the SEC's example.
 

SEC basketball scheduling currently has 18 games.

SEC basketball scheduling starting next season:



How it's going to work:



The Big 12 also has 18 games...perhaps the Big 12 will follow the SEC's example.
Holy unbalanced schedules.

It looks like to me there's two logical groupings for our 3 permanent opponents.

They could keep the PAC12 schools together, Arizona, Arizona St, Utah and Colorado.

Or they group us with the remaining old Big XII North schools, Kansas, Kansas State, Iowa State and Us. (BYU would replace us in the previous scenario).

In either group, we'd play either Kansas or Arizona home-and-home.
 
Holy unbalanced schedules.

It looks like to me there's two logical groupings for our 3 permanent opponents.

They could keep the PAC12 schools together, Arizona, Arizona St, Utah and Colorado.

Or they group us with the remaining old Big XII North schools, Kansas, Kansas State, Iowa State and Us. (BYU would replace us in the previous scenario).

In either group, we'd play either Kansas or Arizona home-and-home.

If we were to do round robin, I'd say Utah is one likely candidate. Kansas probably is begging to get Arizona round robin and I wouldn't expect CU to get UA or KU round robin. KSU and OSU could be the other two round robin schools. Arizona State is a likely school as well.
 
If we were to do round robin, I'd say Utah is one likely candidate. Kansas probably is begging to get Arizona round robin and I wouldn't expect CU to get UA or KU round robin. KSU and OSU could be the other two round robin schools. Arizona State is a likely school as well.
The problem with Utah is that BYU is right there, and the conference can't wait for those two teams to hate each other for the ratings. Its probably going to be Oklahoma St or Iowa state because **** us right?
 
The problem with Utah is that BYU is right there, and the conference can't wait for those two teams to hate each other for the ratings. Its probably going to be Oklahoma St or Iowa state because **** us right?

I'm hoping for Utah and Arizona State in that case while the third would be rotated every year. Arizona would get KU & ASU while KU gets UA & KSU in that regard. BYU would get Utah and possibly ASU (hence why I'm hoping for ASU). OSU is the most likely second permanent round robin game for CU in that case if KSU will not be that because I think they would have KU and either OSU or ISU in that case.
 
Don't know how likely it will be similar for bball, but just in case wanted to note here that, especially for those who don't mosey over to the Olympic sport thread, the Big 12 announced the conference part of the volleyball schedule a few days ago.

The groupings they're using for that sport, at least in 2024, is (18 game schedule - playing all those in your group twice and everyone else once):

"
#1) BYU, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, Arizona State
#2) Kansas, Iowa State, Kansas State, UCF, and West Virginia
#3) Baylor, Houston, TCU, Texas Tech, Cincinnati
"

(Note - one difference to account for - OSU doesn't participate in volleyball, but obviously do play field both men's and women's bball teams.)
 
Article after today's team post-season awards banquet - https://cubuffs.com/news/2024/4/10/...es-celebrate-2023-24-season-at-awards-banquet

"

Buffaloes Celebrate 2023-24 Season At Awards Banquet​

By: Troy Andre, Associate Director/Athletic Communications

BOULDER –
University of Colorado men's basketball head coach Tad Boyle announced the team's 2023-24 season awards Wednesday night at the Buffaloes end of season celebration at the CU Events Center.

KJ Simpson received the Chauncey Billups Award as the team's Most Valuable Player. The Chauncey Billups MVP Award is one of five voted on by Colorado men's basketball student-athletes. Simpson also took home the Best Defender Award. Bangot Dak won the Most Improved Player Award. Tristan da Silva received the Most Inspirational Award and shared the Tebo Family P.A.S.S. Award with classmate Luke O'Brien.

In addition, two annual statistical champion awards were recognized. Simpson won the McKinley Wright IV Assist Award while Eddie Lampkin Jr. won the Stephane Pelle Rebounding Award.

Simpson had a season for the ages for the Buffaloes, leading the team at 19.7 points, 4.9 assists and 1.3 steals per game while ranking third in rebounding (5.8 rpg). He set single-season school records in free throw percentage (.876), minutes played (1,298) and double-figure scoring games (35).

An All-Pac-12 Conference First Team selection, Simpson was the only major conference player in the nation (one of five overall) in 2023-24 that averaged 19.0 points, 5.0 rebounds and 4.0 assists. On the Pac-12 charts, he ranked second in scoring, free throw percentage and assist-to-turnover ratio (2.2), third in 3-point shooting (.434), assists and steals, fourth in minutes, ninth in defensive boards (5.1 drpg) and 14th in overall rebounds.

Simpson received the McKinley Wright IV Assist Award for the third-straight season after leading the Buffaloes with 181, the third-most in a single season in team history, and just one shy of the second spot held by the award's namesake in Wright (182 in 2020-21). He led or shared the team lead in assists 24 times during the season, highlighted by a career and team season-high nine against Arizona on Feb. 10.

Dak, a freshman forward from Lincoln, Neb., appeared in 23 games playing just under seven minutes per contest, but would end up providing key minutes down the stretch as the Buffaloes' bench was stretched thin due to injuries. Originally a redshirt candidate, Dak showed flashes of a bright future throughout Colorado's late season run, playing in all six postseason games.

O'Brien and da Silva shared the team's Tebo Family P.A.S.S. Award. In its seventh season, the Tebo Family P.A.S.S. Award is named in honor of Stephen Tebo, a long-time supporter of the Colorado basketball program. The award was created to recognize the player, or players, that best exemplified the virtues of Perseverance, Attitude, Selflessness and Success.

Colorado's two four-year seniors, O'Brien and da Silva played pivotal leadership roles while helping the Buffaloes to their second NCAA Tournament run during their time in Boulder. In an age of the transfer portal, the senior duo exemplified the advantages of development and growth within a program, which was extremely important this year given the amount of inexperienced, but talented, youth on this year's team.

Lampkin received the Stephane Pelle Rebounding Award, leading the Buffaloes with 260 total rebounds. He ranked fifth in the Pac-12 in overall rebounding at 7.0 per game and ranked third on the offensive glass (2.5 orpg). Lampkin had 11 of Colorado's 19 double-figure rebounding games in 2023-24 and led the Buffaloes with nine double-doubles, including a 17-point, career-high matching 12-rebound performance against Utah in the Pac-12 Tournament.

Colorado finished the 2023-24 season with a school-record 26 wins (26-11). The Buffaloes finished third in the final season of the Pac-12 (13-7), advancing to the Pac-12 Tournament championship game for the third time. Colorado would go on to its 16th NCAA Tournament, and sixth in the last 14 years, winning multiple games in the Big Dance for just the second time in team history.
"
 
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